0

Short chalet in Maryville, Tennessee by Sanders Pace Architecture


Project: Short chalet
Architects: Sanders Pace architecture
Place: Maryville, Blount County, Tennessee, USA
Domain: 3,200 sf
Photos: Keith Isaacs

Short chalet by Sanders Pace Architecture

Sanders Pace architecture He designed the Short Chalet outside the town of Maryville in Blount County. The home is in a pristine location in Tennessee and has breathtaking views of the Great Smoky Mountains.

Short chalet in Maryville, Tennessee by Sanders Pace Architecture

Located on a ridge near Maryville in Blount County, this project offers panoramic views of the Great Smoky Mountains National Park, including Gregory's Bald.

The house was designed for a couple with a large family out of town and is divided into three separate pavilions. These allow the house to be partitioned to efficiently meet the needs of the owners and the ability to expand in the adjoining villa when children and grandchildren visit.

The arrangement of the three pavilions provides access to views and defines the outdoor spaces surrounding the house. The pavilions are combined with floor-to-ceiling glass entrance connections. These rooms should feel like bridges between pavilions.

In response to the topography of the site, there are pavilions on the edges of the ridge. Extending from the foundations of the pavilions is a series of walls covered in Gray Crab Orchard Stone to secure the project on site and create outdoor spaces.

Short chalet in Maryville, Tennessee by Sanders Pace Architecture

The simple triangular shapes are reminiscent of the local structures of the area, while the curtain has been chosen according to the shapes of traditional Japanese architecture. A limited range of materials from stone veneer, wood veneer and steep metal roofs help the house blend in with its surroundings. Two wooden facades were used in the house. The primary siding is Accoya with a brushed Shou Sugi Ban terminate. This traditional Japanese processing method is used to protect wood by burning. The heavily charred surface of the board makes the wood resistant to rot, insects and rot and delays it. The material was chosen as the primary coating because of its low maintenance and naturally dark appearance.

A distinctive feature of the traditional Japanese house is the use of an engawa, a covered strip of flooring, often covered with wood, that runs along the perimeter of the house, which acts as a transition between the house and the garden. Each of the pavilions contains individual engawa rooms at the transition from the interior to the exterior. These enclosed verandas also help control solar heat gain by providing protrusions on large sliding glass doors in engavas.

The exterior of the engawa fields is Accoya with a transparent sealant. Allowing the Accoya's natural color to be visible in these rooms contrasts with the dark Shou Sugi Ban siding and shows what the material looked like before it was charred. The engawa rooms also have floor-to-ceiling sliding doors for access and the view from the interior.

– –Sanders Pace architecture

Short chalet in Maryville, Tennessee by Sanders Pace Architecture

Short chalet in Maryville, Tennessee by Sanders Pace Architecture

Short chalet in Maryville, Tennessee by Sanders Pace Architecture

Short chalet in Maryville, Tennessee by Sanders Pace Architecture

Short chalet in Maryville, Tennessee by Sanders Pace Architecture

Short chalet in Maryville, Tennessee by Sanders Pace Architecture

Short chalet in Maryville, Tennessee by Sanders Pace Architecture

Short chalet in Maryville, Tennessee by Sanders Pace Architecture

Short chalet in Maryville, Tennessee by Sanders Pace Architecture

Short chalet in Maryville, Tennessee by Sanders Pace Architecture

Short chalet in Maryville, Tennessee by Sanders Pace Architecture

Labels: tooth, internally, view, Mountain house, nature, Sanders speeds up architecture, short chalet, Tennessee


Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *